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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
highlight a couple of points that i think make a big difference. realize we have a cohort population between 8 million and 11.5 million of individuals in the united states who are undocumented, who some say are illegal or not lawfully present. they are in a group that is cut off in part and formality from the main economy. this is unwise because immigrants, both skilled and unskilled, in this case, that 8 million to 11 million, provide the innovative engine in the economy in these relatively dark times. i'll address the issue of unemployment. but in these difficult economic times, they provide a certain component to the economy which allows us to innovate and grow at a rate that we otherwise would not. in short, immigrants of all types unaverage are net contributors to the economy, help the actual pie grow bigger, provide more of a pie to split among us all and in turn try to goose innovation in a couple of unanticipated ways. so first, kind of three big points. immigrants are a net contributor to the economy. it is easy to be distracted by the fiscal analysis which is about tax revenues and
having big piles of paperwork that were not read or not completed or not signed. how do we know that people purchasing a limited number of condos in a small site -- i have never seen a project like this where the public have access. you might find this in a community in the homeowners association where there was a golf course, and they needed to underwrite some of the expenses, so they had non-resident memberships, but you will never find it, i don't believe, in a compact residential situation. that a purchaser for $2.5 million might force the 1600 people walking in and out of their facilities. i do not believe that those homeowners would allow it, and i think the first chance at the developer left and the seller of the property was no longer around, they would exercise their legal rights to change the whole order document, which they can do under california law. i would like to see what legal arrangement has been made so that the protections for the remaining facilities run with the land, no matter whether the current parties are involved in the project or not. thank you. commi
, cancer, all of that stuff. america's cup will bring huge revenues. a sole focus on getting the big money in. incidentally, i know a little bit about developing space. as far as recreation and the park, we don't have an off land to develop playgrounds. what we do have is a terminal that has four football fields long of park areas that will have sufficient exercise, playgrounds, and all of that stuff. we don't have an of available plans to develop that. focus on what is needed. let's get the proper development. let's bring in businesses like that. there is the beautification of it. it lets keep the waterfront beautiful. it brings in of a lot of money from events. this report has all the right things. please listen to the people. it they live here and work here. they know what is best. thank you. president olague: [reading names] everyeone elone else i called b. >> my name is nancy shanahan. the luxury condo project that requires the inclusion of a publicly owned a lot held in public trust for the people of california is not what comprehensive planning is about. but that is what the plannin
for themselves and their children, to increase the likelihood that little problems won't turn into great big problems. yes. and fran, what do we tell parents in those situations? i think we tell parents... both jane and jordan talked about the role of parents and how important in each of their stories that parents have. they are the first line to see their young people changing their behaviors, as jane was saying, some of the signs that are out there. we need to tell parents and remind them, first and foremost, that addiction is a disease and it is not their fault. and it is not their young person's fault. they need to know that as well. and if they do what jane said, listen, watch their young people, be interactive with them, get to know their friends, they need to know the signs of what is a normal life for a young person. and when their child begins to act a little differently than they used to act 2 or 3 years ago, that should send some signals to go get help. jordan, your parents obviously saw signs in you. they may not have understood it, and that's okay. we are not asking everyone to
agreement, with the cooperation with other public agencies to plan for what is coming. this is a big effort to make certain that everything comes off without a hitch. we will look into the implementation plans being developed with a different subject areas, and do a quick overview of the upcoming milestones with aspects of the project description coming out along with the environmental impact report. so first, we will start with the venue agreement, which was signed on december 21 of 2010, with san francisco as the host city. the parties to the event of the america's cup authority, who are called the project sponsor. they have all the offshore activities. the sister agency is in charge of the portion of the water. and when you look at these sorts of -- putting on the competitive events, managing the water space. there are three pillars of the city's obligations to bring this to life. the first of them as environmental california quality, getting approval for this after this was completed earlier this year. there are also plans required to be completed, with different approaches to the subje
day our members show courage in bay area courts, and we do ok in the big battles as well. who will ever forget the extraordinary accomplishments of john in defending our college, patrick, from a crazy federal prosecutor in nevada? that level of talent and that level of courage is unique, but every day criminal courts in the bay area shine because my colleagues from ctla are working there. recently ctla issued a public statement against the death penalty. ctla joins other groups and individuals here today in calling for permanent incarceration as california's alternative to the death penalty. this city and county has a great san francisco public defender and we want to express our thanks to jeff adachi for his support of ctla over the years and for his gratitude for being here today. thank you for your taxi and have a great conference -- thank you for your attention and have a great conference. [applause] >> i also want to acknowledge the public defender, past-present president of the california lawyers association. thank you for being here. now, we have our 50th anniversary tr
at that table to really create policies that will minimize that san francisco is not a big business-friendly city. i think we started to go in the wrong direction. the reason why we started walking down that path largely was because of political ideology. when you deal with me, you are dealing with facts, less than politics. i really want to have a positive impact on the city overall. >> good afternoon, everyone. how are you? >> good. >> it's a nice day today. thank you for coming out to our community event. please give a round of [applause] to them. we have a lot of development going on. you see how lovely leland street looks. do you like it? >> yes. >> beautiful, isn't it? we are going to continue. we have a library that is going to be opening up in june. that's right. so i will see you all there at the library. there is a lot of activity going on. it is important we remain connected and engaged. >> would you mind if we were to pull the seniors together and translate for me in a mini meeting? >> yes, sir. >> what we are going ready to do is we are going to have a quick little mini
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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